Field Guide To North America

Field Guide To North America

National Geographic has just launched at new version of its Field Guide to Birds of North America which in printed form is one of THE references for dedicated birders. The app lets you carry around a tremendous amount of information in your pocket about the habits of birds, maps to their habitats and even recordings of their calls. The app is not web based, so it’s a big one. Really big — 839 MB of big, so be sure before you buy and download that you have the room. Of course, this means it’s available when you are out in the wild, and nowhere near a cell tower. The app features videos of selected birds, and connects to the Internet only for the latest birding news. There are a series of filters to help you identify what you are seeing in the field, like habitat, time of year, month, color and more. The app has now added a personal journal, quizzes and a birding tool kit with tips and tricks for beginners or advanced amateurs.

One thing missing is a straight search option, which is surprising. You can get alphabetical lists of birds, or sort them any number of ways, but if you are simply looking to quickly get to information about any bird, that can’t be done with a word search. I should also note that this app is really designed for the iPhone or iPod touch. On the iPad you have to scale it up, which is silly given the number of people who would like a native version for that device. 9.99, not cheap but certainly a value for its usefulness. 30.00 but can be had for less online. This app is simply brimming over with useful information and audio-visual features that take it beyond what the printed version can do. It should be a universal app so iPad users can get more benefit from it, and I think it needs better search features, but birders will be enthusiastic about the many positive aspects of this app. In this article: birds, daily app, daily iphone app, FieldGuidetoBirds, iPhone, iPod, NationalGeographic, nature, newsletter, review All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Keep your ear to the ground — always. Keep an eye out and keep a mental list of those who consistently act the way I described above. By increasing your trusted network, you uncover misinformation and can make corrections. Don’t bad mouth them to anybody. Bad mouthing people is what negative politicians do, and you will likely hear about it eventually. Information gets around remarkably easily in a company. The adage “If you don’t have something good to say, don’t say it” applies here. Don’t alienate them, even if they screw you. The other adage I have found ALWAYS to be true is “never burn bridges,” no matter what. I have never burned a bridge. Those who have, got bitten back hard. Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer. Don’t avoid negative politicians. Network with them. Kind words and praise go a long way. I find that those that are insecure and have self-esteem issues tend to be the most political, so find ways to help them and/or increase their sense of self-worth. But don’t make it up. Be sincere about anything you say or do. Use some of their tactics in a principled manner. Do some self promotion in a way that ALSO promotes others. Network with the powers that be in a way that shows your value to the company. Read “Never Eat Alone” by Keith Ferrazzi for great tactics on how to do this. Another reference for you: Dan King, Principal at Meaningful Careers, wrote a great article called “Winning at Organizational Politics without Losing Your Soul” that gives additional insights and reasons for not keeping your head in the sand. As he states in his article, politics is a game.

One of the most important reasons so many Americans are in financially difficult situations is the lack of economic knowledge and leadership by the politicians. This leads to massive overspending by Washington, which spends more money than it brings in through taxation. So, to make up a portion of the shortfall, the bureaucrats resort to borrowing money from China and other countries, but this still is not enough. At this point, Washington asks the Federal Reserve to print money, which inflates the currency and devalues the dollar. This causes prices to rise for everything else in the economy, like food and transportation. Homeowners whose income is stagnant or falling can not keep up with 10% inflation rates or more, and when their mortgage payment goes up 15% due to an adjustable rate, financial disaster is one paycheck away. An ill-conceived foreign policy that is beyond wasteful also contributes to this problem.